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for higher taxes on top income earners, something missing from the g.o.p. plan. with just three weeks left, the two sides are still at odds with their opening offers. with time ticking away to reach a deal before tax cuts expire and spending cuts hit, president obama today said he's still optimistic a deal will be done and he's willing to compromise, but negotiations just aren't there yet. >> it's going to require what i talked about in the campaign, which is a balanced, responsible approach to deficit reduction that can help give businesses certainty and make sure the country grows. >> tom: the president rejected the proposal republicans presented him yesterday. it would cut the debt by $2.2 trillion over ten years, but would not raise taxes on america's highest earners, the biggest sticking point. the two sides seem to be allowing themselves room to bargain. the president said today he'd be open to lowering tax rates for high earners later next year as part of a broad tax reform package. and senate republican leader mitch mcconnell did not directly endorse the g.o.p. plan. for now, house
would raise $800 billion in revenues by closing loop-holes and reforming the tax code, but stops short of specifics. noticeably missing: the higher taxes on high-wage earners which president obama has insisted on. the white house responded, saying "the g.o.p. proposal does not meet the test of balance. in fact, it actually promises to lower rates for the wealthy and sticks the middle class with the bill." it's not just the federal government under pressure. credit ratings agency fitch calls the fiscal cliff the biggest concern for state credit in 2013. saying, "any meaningful federal deficit reduction is likely to lower state funding, forcing program elimination or backfilling." as the tax hikes and spending cuts approach, u.s. manufacturers saw business shrink last month. the institute of supply management's purchasing managers index fell unexpectedly to 49.5, down from 51.7 in october. a reading below 50 means business has fallen back into contraction. the november statistic is the lowest since july 2009. the dow fell 60, the nasdaq down eight, the s&p 500 lost six. >> susie: jeff sa
as the nation edged closer toward a so- called fiscal cliff that could raise taxes by year's end. we begin with a report from newshour congressional correspondent kwame holman. >> we're going to have to see the rates on the top two percent go up. we're not going to be able to get a deal without it. >> reporter: in his first interview since the election, president obama rejected a proposal from house speaker john boehner. he spoke on bloomberg television. >> unfortunately the speaker's proposal right now is still out of balance. i'm happy to entertain other ideas that the republicans may present. but we are not going to simply cut our way to prosperity or to cut our way out of this deficit problem that we have. we're going to need more revenues. in order to do that, that starts with higher rates for the folks at the top. >> reporter: the president did say today he would consider lowering rates again for the top two percent next year as part of a broader tax overhaul. the house republican plan envisions $2.2 trillion in deficit reductions over the next decade. $800 billion would come from ne
week of january, the u.s. economy will be hit by $600 billion of automatic tax increases. and automatic spending cuts. the phenomenon known as the fiscal cliff. if that happens, it will trigger a recession, or worse. so, president obama is taking action and insisting that republicans agree to increase the existing marginal tax rates on the wealthiest top 2% of u.s. taxpayers. and of course, there is more to the deal. but there will be no negotiations on that big part of the deal unless that tax on the wealthiest 2% is negotiated now. the president could not be more emphatic in stressing the indispensable element of surmounting the cliff is that super-rich revenue. >> we're not insisting on rates just out of spite. or out of any kind of partisan bickering. but rather because we need to raise a certain amount of revenue. >> okay. here is john boehner, the republican house speaker. >> if you look at the plans that the white house have talked about thus far, they couldn't pass either house of the congress. >> republicans proposed raising $800 billion in extra revenues. and that revenue shou
this tax issue, and he looks like he has learned the lesson from various debt negotiations, gej talks and the negotiations of 2011 and he's not giving an inch for the top tax earners expiring this year. >> rose: we conclude this evening with a conversation with stuart stevens former chief strategist and advisor to governor mitt romney and the romney campaign. >> working for governor romney was an extraordinary privilege. and it really was an arar. and i think that he was in this race for the right reasons. he was in it out of a sense of what he could do for the country. to be a small part of that was a great privilege. but i think that republicans need to, we have a good menial, we have to do a better job of getting it out. we need to look at how we need to adjust. >> rose: julianna goldman and stuart stevens when we begin. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. begin this evening with politic. less than a month remains for lawmaker to reach a deal before the fiscal cliff deadline. the whitehouse open sists tax rat
. and with every day that passes, congress and the white house edge close to raising taxes, cutting spending and sending the nation back into recession. here are the arguments -- >> the speaker's proposal right now is still out of balance. he talks about, for example, $800 billion worth of revenues but he says he will do that by lowering rates. when you look at the math, it does not work. >> this week we made a good-faith offer to avert the fiscal crisis and that offer included significant spending cuts and reforms and it included additional revenue and frankly, it was the balanced approach that the president's been asking for. now we need a response from the white house. we can't sit here and negotiate with ourselves. gwen: against that backdrop, new signs today that the economy is strengthening, with the jobless rate dropping to 7.7%, its lowest in four years. but even thats a mixed bag, isnt it, eamon? >> yeah, absolutely. this is a good but not great jobs number. we created 146,000 jobs in this country in november but the unemployment rate goes down to 7.7% for the wrong reasons, because
cliff related selling as shareholders worries that capital gains tax rates will be higher next year. >> still, financial planner sharon appleman says selling stock solely for tax reasons isn't the best idea. >> i definitely think it's a legitimate concern and can be an opportunity. and i would say if somebody was interested in reducing a physician any-- position anyway, that can certainly be a great time to do it, you know, why pay higher taxes in a few months time when you can pay a lower tax now. >> reporter: and some analysts say, before unloading the shares, consider that fundamentals for apple haven't really changed. sure, revenue growth may slow and margins may contract, and there are worries the tech giant will have trouble fending off competition from increasingly popular android products. but, to some analysts, the shares look especially cheap today, especially considering their move south since the september high. >> we think the smart phone trend is still in the early to middle innings and is not in the late innings yet. so we think, to the extent that apple can maintain
. "the new york times" reported republicans might accept higher tax rates on wealthier americans to avoid triggering tax hikes for everyone. in return, they'd demand greater spending cuts next year before raising the federal borrowing limit. >> if congress in any way suggests that they're going to tie negotiations to debt ceiling votes and take us to the brink of default once again as part of a budget negotiation, which, by the way, we have never done in our history until we did it last year, i will not play that game because we've got to... we've got to break that habit before it starts. >> reporter: the 2011 standoff between the president and republicans led the nation to the brink of national default. standard and poor's even lowered its rating on u.s. government bonds. now, the president has proposed he be given authority to raise the debt ceiling without congressional action. house republicans reject that idea. and they've called for raising revenue without rate hikes, plus major savings in entitlement programs. the president argued today a partial deal is possible on taxes, if the g
their counter- offer to the president's plan for a deal both sides say is needed to avoid year-end tax increases. the move was the latest volley in an increasingly tense face- off between the two branches of government. >> with 28 days left to come to a deal on the nation's fiscal cliff, the white house is holding firm on its proposal to raise taxes on the wealthy. spokesman jay carney. >> the obstacle remains at this point the refusal to acknowledge by republican leaders that there is no deal that achieves the kind of balance that is necessary without raising rates on the top 2% wealthiest americans. the math simply does not add up. >> ifill: the white house proposes raising $1.6 trillion in taxes over ten years, imposing higher rates on those making more than $250,000 a year. in a letter sent to the white house today, speaker of the house john boehner rejected the president's approach, writing that republicans cannot in good conscience agree to this approach which is neither balanced nor realistic. his counter-offer, save $2.2 trillion by among other things raising $800 billion in new revenues
the fiscal cliff. with $600 billion in automatic tax hikes and government spending cuts set to start next year, why aren't more firms postponing hiring decisions? >> what we're hearing from businesses is that it is really hard to actually pull back hiring right now, because they've already fired so many workers, gotten so lean that it's really difficult. >> reporter: but not all the surprises in the report were good. at 7.7%, the unemployment rate hit its lowest level since december 2008. but that was mostly due to people giving up their search for work. and there's another disappointing trend, weak wage growth. >> what we are not seeing is strong income generation. the slowing in wage gains-- the weak bargaining power of labor comes across in this report and >> reporter: so although the labor market is not getting worse, it's not getting a lot better, either. and there are plenty of risks that could cause businesses to cancel projects, and hiring plans. >> clearly one of the biggest risks is that we don't see a deal on the fiscal cliff, or that they drag it out over a number of months. a
these negotiations very carefully. the sticking point for conservative republicans is to agree to raise taxes. one of them is republican congressman from georgia, jack houston. there's a lot at stake in america and international economies as well. can you reassure them that you will come to some sort of a deal? >> i think that we will. we're in the early stages of the serious negotiations and that president -- the president has put forth an offer and speaker john boehner has put forth that offer. the fact that this is rejected is to be expected but it is testing ground. we have seen that between them have gone through this process. i believe we will get there. both sides so that we cannot win are refusing to compromise. we both have our right to be here and we have countered with some revenue in places. we want to see what the president will do in terms of cuts. where are concerned about the deficit. i believe we will get there. i really do. >> you are a perennial optimist. you make everything seem sunny. we are at a stalemate. republicans do not want to raise taxes and democrats to know what to -
stalemated over how to avoid automatic tax hikes and spending cuts, come january. house speaker john boehner did speak by phone to president obama this week, and it was widely reported the two have agreed to negotiate directly with each other. but boehner said today, "there's no progress to report." >> four days ago, we offered a serious proposal based on testimony of president clinton's former chief of staff. since then there's been no counteroffer from the white house. instead, reports indicate that the president has adopted a deliberate strategy to slow-walk our economy right to the edge of the fiscal cliff. >> sreenivasan: the president has insisted there will be no deal unless republicans agree to raise tax rates on the top 2%. republicans say the tax hikes would only hurt job creation. but in arlington, virginia, vice president biden said today's jobs report shows the economy is turning a corner, so it's critical to get a deal. >> there is a sense... there is a sense that if we can reach an- - act like adults and reach an agreement here on the fiscal cliff, the upside is much higher e
. >> an obsession to raise taxes is not going to solve the problem. >> a leading conservative decides to give up his senate seats. >> a lot of my role in the senate has been stopping bad things, but we need to do more than that and tell americans what we are for. >> in syria, a concern about the possible use of weapons of mass destruction if south. >> the regime might very well consider the use of chemical weapons. >> the chattering classes are already chatting about 2016. >> look, i am flattered, i am honored. that is not in the future for may. "tim brant's college football captioned by the national captioning institute >> for the record, the unemployment rate has dropped to 7.7%, the economy adding 146,000 jobs in november. we want to keep that in mind as we head towards the fiscal cliff. only four in 10 americans expect the white house and congress to reach a deal on the cliff before the first of the year, and if this goes south, a 53% of the american people are prepared to blame republicans. the president's job approval rating is well over 50%. congress' approval rating is und
corporation tax. the company has nearly 1/3 of the uk coffee shop market, but has only paid the tax once in the past 15 years. starbucks has been stung by public criticism of its actions. you're watching "bbc world news america." still to come on tonight's program, nearly 25 years after a deadly gas attack, one kurdish town is still trying to identify the scores of people who died. to japan now, where the authorities are trying to figure out how tunnel collapsed on sunday, killing at least nine people. huge concrete slabs in the tunnel smashed on to cars. that started a fire on the main route from tokyo to central japan. we report now on that story. >> only this morning, the mangled wreckage of three vehicles was brought -- early this morning, the mangled wreckage of three vehicles was brought from the tunnel. last came a small delivery truck. the driver had been trapped, but alive. by the time rescuers got to him, he was dead. the collapsed tunnel lies deep in the mountains of central japan, just to the north of mount fuji. it is part of the expressway that links tokyo to central and we
will now be squeezed, and there will be a tax rates on the pension pops. >> i know these tax measures willthought to balance not be r. ways to reduce the deficit never are. but we must act together. when you look for savings, it is fair to local to the 1%. >> with multiple forecasts being downgraded, it has now become an issue about competence. they argue not only has the chancellor failed, but failed on his own terms. >> it has been completely derailed. the one test they set for themselves, balance the books and get the debt falling by 2015, that is now in tatters. >> after all, the facts and figures of the chancellor's statement -- after all of the facts and figures of the chancellor's statement, we are left with a feeling of malaise. >> you are watching bbc world news america. still to come, aero controversy at the hospital after the duchess of game birds -- the after information on the duchess of cambridge is released to two is jockeys. >> in bangkok, thousands of thais turned out to catch a glimpse of the mark on his 85th birthday in a rare public appearance prepare aero controvy
with increased taxes, because of the fiscal cliff, if the worst happens, consumer demand is just going to fall off. they are already taking action today to try to prepare for that eventuality. but the consumer is kind of blankly ignoring this, and confidence is up for really lots of reasons. i mean, the net worth of households has been repaired. about two-thirds of it has come back as house prices rise and stock prices are now double what they were at the bottom in march of '09. when you look at state and local budgets, they're now much better with revenue rising. so the layoffs and budget cuts, we think are waning, if not over. housing is clearly coming back. things are improving and consumer confidence reflects that. >> tom: but there is that dark cloud of the fiscal cliff. you mentioned it earlier, businesses planning for consumer confidence to go off that cliff if we go off it as a country. do you not agree with that prospect? >> well, no. i believe it will -- if nothing happens and there is no agreement, i think there will be a mild, kind of technical recession in the first half of next y
be no deal unless tax rates went up on the wealthy. >> the closer it gets to the brink, the more stressed we're going to be. >> woodruff: president obama made the short trip to northern virginia today to underline his plan to avert the fiscal cliff. at the home of what the white house called a typical middle class family, mr. obama said he's optimistic that agreement can be reached, but again drew a hard line for republicans in congress. >> everybody's is going to have to share in some sacrifice. but it starts with folks who are in the best position to sacrifice. who are in the best position to step up . just to be clear i'm not going to sign any package that somehow prevents the top rate from going up, the top 2% from going up. >> woodruff: the president phoned house speaker john boehner yesterday, their first direct talk in almost a week. but today white house spokesman jay carney wouldn't share details of the call. >> we believe it's in the interest of achieving an agreement not to do that. >> reporter: treasury secretary timothy geithner said yesterday the white house was absolutely will
: house republican leaders offered their own proposal today to avert the prospect of a year-end tax hike. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we get perspective on the partisan tug- of-war in washington, from one half of the team that produced
to increase taxes on the wealthiest americans. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, kwame holman has the latest on wast
, which has global implications. it is a combination of tax increases and spending cuts. it will take place at the end of the year faction is not taken. right now there is a standoff which christine lagarde has warned u.s. lawmakers, they have a duty to solve. we sat down with her here in washington. >> christine lagarde, the fiscal cliff, how concerned are they about the ramifications? >> people around the world are concerned about it. it appears to be the case there was more concerned about the eurozone than the fiscal cliff. now things have changed and there is more concerned about the fiscal cliff. they asked about a resolution. >> what could the impact speed? we are looking at a time when the global recovery is fragile at best. >> of u.s. is 20% of the global economy. if the u.s. suffers as a result of a fiscal cliff, a complete wiping out of its growth is going to have repercussions around the world. probably half of that. if the u.s. economy has less growth, it will probably be 1% less in mexico, canada, probably less so in europe and japan. but there will be a ripple effects.
to generate billions of dollars. it closes a tax loophole for out of state corporations and requires that half the money be spent on improving energy efficiency in schools and public buildings. and paul rogers, what kind of improvements would be made to the schools and what would this mean to them? >> these are the kind of things that aren't particularly sexy, like when you see people hold press conferences because they put big new solar rays on school buildings and things. this is much more mundane stuff. like new insulation, double-pain windows, switches so the lights go out when you go out of the building. what's interesting, if you talk to engineers and energy experts who really study this stuff is you get a lot more bang for your buck when you spend those bucks doing energy efficiency rather than doing these big elaborate renewable projects. you know, it doesn't make sense to take a school building which is old with drafty windows and put $1 million solar ray on the top. whatever electricity you generate, you're then going to basically waste because you're leaking power out the windows. a
, and no new taxes on the wealthy. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. auto sales speed up in november, with buyers taking advantage of ultra-cheap financing to ditch
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)